Dr Robert Jay Lifton THE NAZI DOCTORS:
                        Medical Killing and the
                            Psychology of Genocide ©
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The Experimental Impulse 
prisoners, mostly Germans, prostitutes were meant to be a work incentive and were also intended to help diminish widespread homosexuality among male prisoners (occasionally prostitutes were assigned to known homosexuals for that purpose, with predictable results).³ The gynecologist Dr. Wanda J. told how prostitutes were instructed to visit her if they noticed any indication of venereal disease. Camp commanders frequently appeared on Block 10 to choose particular prostitutes for their subcamps. As Dr. J. put it in discussing the prostitutes, “that was a part of everything.”

Extreme rumors spread through the camp about Block 10. Prisoners considered it a “sinister place” of mysterious evil. There were widespread rumors that Clauberg was conducting experiments in artificial insemination, and women were terrified of having “monsters” implanted in their wombs. Some survivors I spoke to believed that those experiments actually occurred. Another account had Clauberg speaking of his intentions to carry out artificial-insemination experiments in the future. There were also rumors of a “museum” on Block 10: “Skulls, body parts, even mummies”; and one survivor insisted, “A friend … saw … our Gymnasium [high school] teacher stuffed [mummified] on Block 10.” Again, anything was possible, and whatever occurred there was likely to be a manifestation of the Nazi racial claim. 
Sterilization by Injection: “The Professor”
Block 10 was often known as “Clauberg’s block,” because it was created for him and his experimental efforts to perfect a cheap and effective method of mass sterilization. He was Block 10’s figure of greatest authority, “the main man for sterilization” as Dr. J. put it, and the one who “has the extras in equipment and space”: in addition to the wards, an elaborate X-ray apparatus and four special experimental rooms, one of which served as a darkroom for developing X-ray films. As a civilian, Clauberg was an Auschwitz outsider who rented facilities, research subjects, and even prisoner doctors from the SS. He was a powerful outsider, holding a reserve SS rank of Gruppenführer, or lieutenant general. Höss and everyone else were aware that Himmler was interested in the work and had given the order that brought Clauberg to Auschwitz. He began his Auschwitz work in December 1942 in Birkenau; but after persuading the authorities that his important research required a special block, he transferred his experimental setting to Block 10 in Auschwitz in April 1943 .

His method was to inject a caustic substance into the cervix in order to obstruct the fallopian tubes. He chose as experimental subjects married women between the ages of twenty and forty, preferably those who had borne children. And he first injected them with opaque liquid in order to determine by X ray that there was no prior blockage or impairment. He had experimented with different substances, but was very secretive about the exact nature of the one he used, probably intent upon protecting any  
Medical Killing and the
Psychology of Genocide

Robert J. Lifton
ISBN 0-465-09094
© 1986
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