The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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What is striking is to see that of all the nationalities the Jews are the only people whose population in 1959 is less than in 1939 and even in 1926, and this despite a contribution of nearly 700,000 persons in 1940 coming from the Baltic countries and from Bessarabia. The effectives of all the other nationalities increased between 1939 and 1959. In the case of the Russians, the Georgians, the Armenians and the Germans, it is certainly due to natural growth. In other cases – Ukrainians, Bielorussians – to an increase somewhat exaggerated, no doubt, following the annexations of regions in which these nationalities were relatively numerous. In the case of the Poles and especially that of the Rumanians, the Estonians, the Lithuanians and the Latvians, there is a fantastic leap forward which is evidently explained by annexation. No less evident is the explanation of the considerable and specific decreases in the Jewish population after 1939: they are consequences of the "final solution."

This analysis can be improved and it allows one to figure up these consequences with a good approximation. In fact, one may consider the years from 1926 to 1939 as a reference period for the growth of the population of the USSR: it begins five years after the end of the civil war, with the recovery due to the "new economic policy;" and despite the very numerous upheavals which characterize the history of Russia during the Thirties, it remains relatively stable from the demographic point of view. In any event, it is much more stable than the period which succeeds it with the war from 1941 to 1945, the invasion of vast territories, the heavy military and civilian human losses, and the long absence from their homes of young people at the age of procreation. By calculating the annual growth rate in the conditions of the USSR during the period, 1926-39, it is possible afterwards to extrapolate for the following twenty years by thus determining what its numerical value should "normally" have been in 1959. A comparison of the value thus calculated with the one really ascertained by the census allows one to figure up, with good probability, the consequences in human losses of the war years.

The problem of highest priority for us is that of the Jewish population. However, it is instructive to compare the results of the calculation obtained in the case of other nationalities numerically comparable to the Jewish population and for whom the effects of the war were not specifically grave. Such are the cases of the Georgians, the Armenians and the Germans. In fact, the Georgian and Armenian Republics suffered a short-lived occupation, without particular violence on the part of the occupier. As for the Germans in the USSR, they were in large part deported to Siberia in 1941, where they lived in material conditions which were certainly difficult, but less dramatic than those, for example, of the Ukrainians or the Bielorussians. Also, the separation of the sexes did not take place because they were not mobilized into the army. Finally, after the war, there was a small immigration of 50,000 Armenians, which is numerically negligible, who came to USSR from eastern Asia and from Europe. As for the Germans of the
    
   

 
The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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