The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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Jew, to a great extent fallen into his hands. We have already indicated that this proclamation was overloaded with imprecations against the Judeo-Anglo-Saxons and the Judeo-Bolsheviks, culminating in the announcement that the Jews within the interior of the Reich were about to be definitively finished off.

It is thus apparently to reply to an intense interest on the part of Hitler that Himmler ordered the report from Korherr. It remains nevertheless that Himmler took on his own conscience the responsibility of the massacre of the deported Jewish masses, except in what concerned the Soviet Jews, whose extermination was spontaneously ordered by Hitler under the pretext of an essential measure of military security.

On reading the report of Korherr, Himmler thought that it could eventually serve as evidence of the liquidation of the Jewish presence, all while leaving the means employed to achieve this objective in the shadows. These shadows, such as were cast by the report over its own details, were not, however, opaque. They were just sufficient to warn the future historian that if the work of purification of the German vital space had been pitiless and radical, there would be no reason to ask how one had gone about it.

Let us recall the hypothesis that the American psychologist Gilbert presented to the defendant Goering in the prison of Nuremberg and with which the latter agreed. It concerned the attitude of Hitler himself, namely that Hitler desired the disappearance of the Jews by no matter what means and that he did not want to hear about them any more.

In a first draft of the report, Korherr employed the expression "special treatment" (Sonderbehandlung). He used it in regard to the 1,449,692 Jews who "were sent through" the extermination camps of the General Government (operation of Globocnik) and of Wartegau (the extermination camp of Chelmno). The expression "special treatment" was not accepted by Himmler. His aide de camp communicated to Korherr that Himmler wanted this term to be replaced by that of "transportation" (Transportierung). "Transportation" is a variant of "evacuation."

The entire "final solution" was presented in the report (p. 15) as the result of four factors: the emigration, the excedent of deaths over births and, finally, the evacuation. These factors evoked nothing macabre. But the future historian studying the reports of Korherr might decide even so to raise the question as to the meaning of the evacuations. The "final solution of the Jewish question" consisted in the disappearance of the Jews from the German vital space. This principle was loudly proclaimed. Besides, Korherr specified that he counted the evacuations as "departures" (Abgange). Given that the destination of these evacuations did not go beyond the German vital space (all while being beyond the limits of the Reich proper), and that in conformity with the principle no Jewish reserve was evoked in that space, the "departures" in question could only be departures from earthly life.
    
   

 
The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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