The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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the speech of October 6 in Poznan, he insisted upon explaining the extermination of Jewish women and children. These texts lead one to think that the extermination of Jewish men was supposed to be already known and did not necessitate any justification; and that it was a question at the time of Himmler's providing a "justification" only of the ordered murder of the mass of Jewish women and children. The memoirs of von Schirach contain the following quotation from a speech that Himmler allegedly made on May 29, 1944, in Poznan at the City Hall "before the national and regional leaders":
"I ask that you listen to what I am going to tell you in this circle and to keep it strictly to yourselves... The annihilation of the Jews is a harsh and painful task. We found ourselves faced with the following question: What was to be done with the women and children? There, too, I endeavoured to find a radical solution. I did not in fact have the right to exterminate men – I mean to kill (them) or have (them) killed – and to afterwards allow the proliferation of their breed, which would take vengeance on our sons and grandsons... It was thus necessary to take the decision fraught with consequences to act in such a way that this people disappear from the surface of the earth... We are carrying out this task without – at least I believe I may say it – our men's suffering in their minds and souls..."
Himmler insisted on this last affirmation. We have cited it in his oration of October 4, 1943, in Poznan; and we have also found it in that of May 5, 1944, before the generals.

Two documents inform us of the manner in which the "final solution" was to appear to public opinion. One of them was intended at that moment for an ultra-secret use. The other, on the contrary, regulated the information to be given to the public, preoccupied by the turn taken by the anti-Jewish movement.

The Inspector of Statistics Korherr in March-April 1943 (NO-5193-5198) drew up for Himmler a detailed report and an abridged report (the latter destined to be presented to Hitler) on the "Final Solution of the Jewish Question." Himmler wrote on April 9, 1943 (NO-5197), to the Chief of the Sipo-SD (Kaltenbrunner) (133):
"I have received from the Inspector of Statistics the statistical report on the final solution of the Jewish question. I consider this report as very good as eventual documentation for future times, that is, for the purpose of camouflage. Presently it must neither be published nor communicated. The most important thing for me, now as previously, is that this time one transport as many Jews as humanly possible to the East. I want to be informed in the brief monthly reports only of how many of them have been sent each month and how many Jews still remain at the given time."
It was during a period of great military upheaval that Himmler had Korherr draw up this statistical balance sheet of the "final solution." At the beginning of 1943, Hitler was caught up in the whirlwind of the defeats of the Wehrmacht. His proclamation of February 24, 1943, on the celebration of the foundation of the Party, was a manifestation his will to compensate himself and his followers for the military disasters by the certainty that the Reich was in the process of liquidating, and would succeed in liquidating, the adversary par excellence, the
    
   

 
The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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