The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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Eichmann at his trial hesitated between these two figures. Under questioning he believed that it was Heydrich who had signed the document. But having explicitly stated that it was a question of the summer or even the end of the summer of 1942, he rectified his testimony at the hearing. He admitted that Heydrich not being alive at that time, Himmler (who then personally directed the Sipo-SD) had been the signatory. Eichmann related that the Chief of the Gestapo Muller remarked that Globocnik was the only one to make a request of this nature.

In fact, Hoess had contented himself with the verbal order from Himmler. The task which the latter entrusted to him was, however, gigantic. But by his functions and by his rank, he was a minor SS official. The word of the Reichsführer was sufficient for him. Let us note that there was still another center of extermination, outside of the field of action of Globocnik and that of Hoess. This was in the province of Lodz (Polish territory annexed to the Reich), where the extermination camp of Chelmno had been in operation since December 1941. Greiser, the Gauleiter of that region, in July 1941 addressed a letter to Himmler wherein he asked the latter's agreement for the extermination of the Jews unfit to work who encumbered the ghetto of Lodz. The consent was given, following which the camp of Chelmno was created. Its equipment for extermination by gassing (mobile gas chambers) began to function in December 1941. Greiser was satisfied with the written consent given by Himmler, without raising the question of an Order of the Führer. Until 1943 hundreds of thousands of Polish Jews were exterminated there. But, as far as Globocnik is concerned, it must be taken into account that it was he who was by far the principal exterminator of about two million Polish Jews. In addition, his operation took place in the region under the authority, all the more sensitive as it was tottering, of the Governor General Frank. This situation may explain the care he took to have an entirely sufficient justification for his mission. But at the same time his attitude underscored his uncertainty concerning the instructions of Himmler given in the name of Hitler, but not confirmed by Heydrich, who in Hitler's name was responsible for the "final solution."

The other aspect of the "final solution," the deportation "far to the East in the "zones of operation" of the Einsatzgruppen, also knew a period of uncertainty as to it ratification by an Order of the Führer.

The deportation of the Jews of the Reich was certainly proposed by Heydrich to Hitler in August 1941, but it was not to be fully accepted by the latter. The question was brought up on August 15, 1941, in the course of an important conference convoked at the Ministry of Propaganda. Loesener, chairman for racial questions at the Ministry of the debates was present at the conference and drew up a report on the debates for the Secretary of State of his ministry. (115) Let us point out the following passage:
    
   

 
The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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