The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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"Outside of this work, we have begun to study world Judaism in a systematic manner (partly by direct contacts) given that the decisions for the continuation of the solution to the Jewish question in Germany imply an exact knowledge of the leading Jewish organizations on a universal scale." (50)
He insisted in his semestrial report for June to December 1939 (CDXXXVII-25) on the importance of intensifying work abroad; for the emigration of the Jews, which was taking place under constantly increasing pressure, displaced the field of action of the Jews to foreign countries.

Among the few confidence men and informers of whom he disposed abroad, the central role was played by people in the Near East. In the report for January to June, 1938 (CDXXXVII-23), Hagen indicated one man in New York, another in Paris, one in Bucharest. But these names were crossed out. There remain in a stable manner three or four persons for the Near East and three persons through whom the II-112 tried to organize clandestine transportation of Jewish emigrants or ways to transfer money for the emigrants. These were the essential subjects of Hagen's correspondence with his men of confidence or informers (CCXXXIV). It happened that the SD and the Gestapo together disposed of the same informer. Occasionally, Hagen's correspondants [sic] also provided political information aside from the Jewish question. Hagen welcomed it gladly but as less important complementary information and transmitted it to the appropriate sections of the SD. All of the activity of intelligence-gathering seems not to have amounted to much. The II-112 learned a great deal about the structures of Judaism all over the world, but the documentation gives the impression that it sought its knowledge primarily in non-secret sources.

The essential preoccupation of the II-112 was the intensification of Jewish emigration. On June 20, 1938, (51) Hagen informed Eichmann of the success of his talks with the Ministry of the Economy on the use of funds coming from contributions granted to the Reich by Jewish organizations abroad to aid emigration.

In a note of November 7, 1938, Hagen proposed to develop propaganda which would incite England to grant additional possibilities for this emigration. In the course of that year, Hagen emphasized several times in his notes to Six the necessity of obtaining from foreign countries greater possibilities for the Jewish emigration. The II-112 also involved itself in the organization of an illegal emigration.

On February 6, 1939, Hagen wrote to one of his confidence men, director of an important travel agency, about the failure of the transport of Jews that the latter had organized to Paraguay. He communicated to him the rumours according to which the government of that country would accept the illegal immigration on the condition that it be remunerated at a certain rate per head. In May and June, 1939, the director of the travel agency corresponded intensely with the II-112 (Hagen put him in contact with Eichmann and Dannecker) to execute the project buying old Greek boats for clandestine transportation of Jews, the
     
   

 
The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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