WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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possible, it would mean that this cooperation is plunging its roots into a criminal past.

One of the people in Achenbach's law office, his former client Horst Wagner, was liaison between Ribbentrop and Himmler. It was Wagner and the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem who, in 1943-1944, sent to death thousands of Jewish children rather than let them go to Palestine.

There you have an example of German-Arab cooperation that we would not care to see again.

This is why those people in Germany who have the courage to assume their responsibility as Germans in regard to the Jewish people are also asking the Arab world, through me, to change its unjustly aggressive policy toward the State of Israel, and to admit the sovereign existence of Israel within secure and recognized frontiers.

This is why we are also asking Egypt to influence the Syrians and Iraqi authorities, so that the living conditions of the Jewish communities in Syria and Iraq may be improved. The lot of those Jews signifies, to the entire world, the lot suffered by Jews in Arab territory.

It is my intention to do the same in Damascus, Baghdad, and Beirut. But this time I have no visas. It would have been a waste of time to try and get them. As I check in at the Egyptian Airline, the Reuter correspondent informs me that a visa will be ready for me in Cairo. Some hours later I land in Egypt; I have no trouble the first night. The following morning, on the advice of the press corps, I report to the Ministry of Information, near the Nile. I am received courteously by Dr. Metwalli, chief of the Foreign Press section. I explain the purpose of my visit. He telephones to the office of the National Assembly and asks to see my dossiers (they also include copies of anti-Jewish correspondence between the Mufti and Nazi officials), in order that he may inform the President of the Assembly, as the latter cannot see me personally.

Thursday morning, before boarding the plane for Damascus at the Cairo airport, I have a televised interview with CBS in which I explain the major reasons for my Mideast tour. I am the only European on the plane, and I am aware of stares of curiosity. At the airport at Damascus the police keep me waiting a half hour and then say I am not authorized to receive a visa. It is now close to noon. They tell me I can return to Cairo or proceed to Beirut. Of course I choose Beirut, but I have to wait until next morning. So I spend eighteen hours in the icy drafts of the transit area, with nothing to do but observe the comings and goings of a handful of planes, most of them from Arabia and Kuwait, carrying picturesque
     
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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