WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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will help the ratification of the Franco-German treaty and you will bring respect for German justice, which it surely needs."

The verdict is to be announced Tuesday, July 9. Meanwhile two events give a great boost to our cause. On July 7 the Knesset in special session unanimously approves a protestation against my trial, and blames the court for the incidents that victimized the former deportees. All parties collaborated in rushing through the formalities, so that the debate took place and the motion was approved the same day. Ygal Allon, the Minister of Foreign Affair Haika Grossman, Meir Palik (Moked), and Ehud Olmerd (Free Center) each made a speech.

Monday, July 8. There is a summit meeting in Bonn between Schmidt, the new chancellor, and Giscard d'Estaing. That evening Schmidt announces, to the amazement of Germany: "I have resolved before the President of the French Republic that the agreement will be ratified before the end of the year." The summit was expected to deal with economics; it opened with the agreement.

The French press carries the story of my trial on the front pages every day. An article by Maurice Delarue, chief of the diplomatic section of Le Monde, puts great pressure on Bonn. "The European Union is not only a matter of trade, factories, grains, and currency. It is also a matter of men. It is not with the Germany of Lischka and the judges of Cologne that the French wish to shape the European Union; it is with the Germany of Willy Brandt and Beate Klarsfeld."

Monday, July 9. There are many of us at Bonn. We have come in a bus chartered by LICA. In the morning we lay flowers on the monument to the German anti-Nazis, and we read the text of the epistle of Thomas Mann, "To the Germans," written during the war. Then we take flowers to the prison in Cologne where countless members of the French Resistance were executed. M. Katzman, cantor of the Synagogue on rue Copernic in Paris, reads the last and magnificent letter written by Abbé Deroy, who was guillotined here in 1943.

Then at 2 P.M. comes the verdict. To the astonishment of almost everyone, but not mine, as I had sensed de Somoskoey's rage, the sentence is: two months in prison without obligation to serve the time already passed in preventive jail (37 days – 16 in 1971 and 21 in 1974) and without obligation to serve immediately the time
     
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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