WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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thirty years ago should long ago have been swept out of the way. I was about to protest, but Herr Stange stopped me. If this happens again, my client and I will have to leave the court. As for alleged instructions from Jerusalem, I perceive you do not understand the situation of Israeli lawyers. I received my instructions thirty years ago when I learned that my entire family had been killed by the German Nazis at Bialystok." The judge withdrew into his shell.

The trial drags on with the twenty-one witnesses for the prosecution, which has its nose stuck tight in facts and dares not raise its eyes to look into causes. This trial needs dynamite. The resister René Clavel makes an appointment for June 27 with a member of Giscard d'Estaing's cabinet. He informs the minister that he is determined to make himself heard by fair means or foul at the trial where the presiding judge refuses to hear the testimony of the muzzled French witnesses. Informed of this, the President of the Republic intervenes in an extraordinary fashion the next day, June 28. Through diplomatic channels he sends a message to the German Minister of Foreign Affairs declaring that he is concerned about my trial, demanding that the French witnesses be allowed to testify, and reminding His Excellency that the Bundestag has still not ratified the accord. On Saturday, June 29, de Somoskoey reverses himself: the court will hear the French witnesses.

Third session, Monday, July 1. My faithful team, Jean Pierre-Bloch, and René Clavel, along with youths of the Jewish Student Front are present. It is Lischka's turn to testify. All my friends have put on their medals; the associations have sent flag-bearers. I enter the court between two rows of French flags that honor the Germany I represent. A storm breaks. De Somoskoey protests against the letter from Giscard d'Estaing. "I cannot take this letter into consideration. This is an intrusion on the independence of the court." He makes it known that the Minister of Justice has replied to this intervention on the part of the President of the Republic that "In Germany the judges are independent and subject only to the law."

The same day there is an editorial in the Israeli paper Maariv saying: "This intervention was highly necessary for public morality, but it is certainly without precedent in the history of international relations. The step taken by M. Giscard d'Estaing was intended to demonstrate with what gravity France looks upon the situation. The intervention of the French head of state has communicated
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
Previous Page  Back Page 313 Forward  Next Page