WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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At the entrance to the court there is a silent demonstration of German women, members of the VVN. Each carries a poster protesting my trial and demanding that Lischka be placed on trial instead. The judge tries to provoke me. He reproaches me: "You have duties toward Germany and not only toward humanity." I answer, "All that I do I am doing for Germany." The audience applauds spontaneously. There is an interminable recital of events. The judge produces a translation he has had made of the chapter of my book describing the attempt to kidnap Lischka. The translation is read; certain points are highlighted. I had forgotten the name of a street. The judge berates me for this lapse of memory, saying, "Now, I wouldn't have forgotten." I answer: "I'll make a note of that and next time I'll ask you to join my team." De Somoskoey is speechless. The next morning he threatens to put me in jail for insolence. Marinsky, incensed, jumps up and says: "You said you would have the chapter read, don't stop with this episode, but continue with the dossier on Lischka, which follows." Trapped, the prosecuting attorney is obliged to require a reading-lasting several hours – of the pages of my book devoted to the career of Lischka in the Gestapo, along with the documents quoted therein.

Second session, Thursday, June 27. De Somoskoey attacks: "In the course of the previous session Herr Marinsky received two notes from two people in the room. We understand that Jerusalem is very much interested in this trial, but Herr Marinsky can wait until the end of the session to receive instructions. Who are these persons and what was the content of those messages? Should I not include them in the minutes?"

Marinsky, very courteously: "I apologize for my ignorance of German procedure; I had noticed notes passing between the judges and I thought this was permissable. The first person was Yehuda Milo, First Secretary of the Israeli Embassy. I asked him: 'Is there any mail for me?' as I have given the Embassy address to my friends in Israel. The second person was Alfred Wolman, the representative of the newspaper Yediot Aharonot, whom I asked: 'Can you go out and get me some aspirin?' " Continuing in a louder voice: "But I have not finished my explanations. You all have eyes to see my messages, but none of you of course noticed that your clerk was laughing and sending notes to the usher while you were reading with evident boredom how Lischka was putting Jews to death. That's a very old story, isn't it? In your opinion the dust of
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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