WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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vacation – provided I am still at liberty this summer and not back in a sinister cell, which this time, if I am given an unequivocal prison sentence, would be in the decrepit prison of Essen. Achenbach is that town's deputy.

Arie Marinsky (who is about to leave for Paris to check all details with Serge) and I work out our tactic. He now has all the dossiers in his hands and has put great effort into assimilating in so short a time all the historical facts about the war criminals. On June 20 Marinsky leaves Paris for Cologne, where he informs Presiding Judge de Somoskoey that he firmly intends to plead my case in English. De Somoskoey refuses. Marinsky says that in that case I (Beate) will withdraw counsel and remain silent if my chief lawyer is not permitted to speak. De Somoskoey does not wish to yield. The case is scheduled to come up Tuesday, June 25. Saturday, June 22, de Somoskoey reverses himself: he agrees to allow Marinsky to defend me as my principal lawyer, and in English. But in fear that I may dismiss my lawyers and refuse to speak if I am displeased with their conduct of the trial, he appoints on his own an additional lawyer to defend me, Herr Jochum of Cologne, with whom, of course, I shall have to deal at some future date.

In spite of all the research and documentation he has undertaken to win our case, Serge, who had decided in the course of our experiences that he should enter an independent profession, had begun his law studies in February 1973. With his degree in history from the Sorbonne and as a graduate of the Institute of Political Studies in Paris, he was admitted as a third-year student to the Law School of the University of Paris, and after a few months passed the examinations to enter the fourth year. Now, in June 1974, he faces his finals. But at the same time he is bearing the full weight of the preparation for the trial. He says: "You were released from jail because of the pressure from Israel, but to win the trial we need strong public reaction in France." So he is putting all his energy into building up this reaction, while taking – and passing – his law examinations. Our tactic is to play up the true nature of the conflict and refute the heavy legalistic collar with which the court intends to constrict the trial. It will be a clash of wills at the end of which one of the two antagonists will necessarily lose and the other will win.
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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