WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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among the victims of Nazism. As a result of the non-signing and non ratification of such agreements thousands of Nazi criminals are free today – among them over a thousand who were already convicted in absentia, in France, for sending a hundred thousand Jews to the gas chambers. This situation is intolerable to human society."

Because of his political obligations and the situation in Israel, Shmuel Tamir cannot leave his country to represent me at my trial, which may be a long one. He asks his friend Arie Marinsky, an eminent lawyer, to take his place and represent me at Cologne at the request of the Israeli Bar and of the Association of Invalid Victims of Nazism. Marinsky will be assisted by Jürgen Stange, a lawyer from West Berlin. Arie Marinsky immediately accepts. He takes the next plane to Paris and with Serge's help prepares for his coming confrontation with the Cologne court.

In Paris, Le Monde prints a petition with a long list of signatories in support of my action and demanding that I be released and ratification approved. Outstanding Jews were among the signers: many leaders of the Resistance, political men like Mitterand (then in the midst of the presidential campaign), writers, journalists, lawyers.

In Cologne, Arie Marinsky and Stange fight inch by inch with Victor de Somoskoey, chairman of the court, a stern, intransigent man who desires to limit the trial to the simple fact of a violation of the law. In his eyes I am merely a delinquent in a civil case and he does not understand or wish to understand the public excitement over my arrest. At the end of eight hours of discussion, Marinsky obtains my release in the personal custody of Benjamin Halevi and my promise to appear at my trial. At the same time the 30,000 marks bail paid three years ago by Mr. Lichtenstein is refunded by him. De Somoskoey seems to have gained the impression that Marinsky will not speak at my trial and only Stange will be responsible for my defense, so there will be no confrontation with the Israeli lawyer. But before long he will realize that this was a misapprehension. For Marinsky had clear insight into the true nature of most German magistrates, as represented by de Somoskoey. He confesses his apprehensions in the Jerusalem Post:
Mrs. Klarsfeld is in real danger. The German legal machine may be inflexible to a point that we may not even imagine. It may seem totally unthinkable to us that an idealist like Mrs. Klarsfeld should be incarcerated while some of the world's most ruthless murderers like Lischka stay free and unpunished. But it is quite possible that this is
     
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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