WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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my country, while the criminals I accuse with ample documentation enjoy total impunity. It's all very well to have good morale, but it doesn't help to be locked up with a young woman who, jealous of her husband's love for their little daughter, whom he could "eat up," served her to him for dinner in the form of meat balls. Or another who had mowed down her fiancé with a scythe. Or with Hermine Braunsteiner, the concentration-camp guard extradited from the United States, who confessed she used to set dogs on the Jews, but whom I used to see here during recess daintily lift earthworms off the pavement and set them down on the grass, all the while grumbling against the American judges ("all Jews") responsible for her extradition. Moreover, Gregorius, my lawyer from Essen, is so pessimistic and negative that little by little my morale weakens. Gregorius is probably influenced by Professor Kaul of East Berlin. Kaul has written Serge a violently critical letter, blaming him for my "childish" action and declaring that France and especially Israel will never do anything to help me. Serge sends this letter and other news to me through friends, who keep up their struggle against German bureaucracy and manage to get in to see me every other day in spite of regulations – an Israeli couple traveling in Germany, my mother-in-law, Julien, the two Henris and still another Henri, Henri Hajdenberg, a young lawyer (brother of Serge and Monique who had been arrested at Essen, and of Elisabeth, who had demonstrated at the Bundestag), and a delegation of Israeli journalists who are touring Germany as guests of the German government. Serge and I decide to get rid of our two lawyers, Kaul and Gregorius, as we have lost confidence in them.

A number of delegations of former Maquis and deportees picket the German Embassy in Paris. The UNDIVG charters a bus for forty-five of its members. The bus arrives in Bonn on the morning of May 2 with Julien Aubart in charge. The resisters are all wearing their decorations, their deportee shirts. Serge has prepared a number of posters and banners. The delegation goes to press headquarters, near the Bundestag, trespassing on territory supposed to be kept cleared. The journalists have been alerted; they flock to the scene. So do the police – more than two hundred, helmeted and armed with clubs. After several ineffective warnings, the police prepare to charge. The German reporters succeed in dissuading them, warning them of what a disastrous impression it would make on the international press to see French Resistance heroes beaten by German police.
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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