WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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oreign affairs committee, which, in cooperation with the judicial affairs committee, was supposed to study the Franco-German accord. These dossiers were to be given to the members of the two committees. A few days later we learned that Achenbach had been named to be the reporter of the foreign affairs committee on the accord. No doubt our dossiers were read, but Achenbach was all-powerful. He represented big industry and he was also head of the lobby for amnesty of war crimes.

While Serge was at the Bundestag, I went to the Knesset in Jerusalem, where I campaigned for Israel to put pressure on Bonn to ratify the accord. Since most of the Jews deported from France were stateless, it seemed only right that Israel should be concerned to honor their memory and keep watch on their murderers.

My lawyer, Shmuel Tamir, obtained a pass for me. But my arrival was delayed two hours by the police because I had a German passport and I had not known I required a visa. I was being met by Akiva Nof and Ehud Olmerd, of Likud, the opposition party, and also by our friend Eli Ben Gal, who had just returned to Israel from France after having represented the Mapam, one of the parties in power. To give my action the greatest weight, I had chosen to come to Israel the day after Brandt had arrived for an official visit. I cannot say I was given the same kind of welcome as that accorded to members of the German delegation. It appeared rather that I was an embarrassment and that I would be prevented from attending any official reception where the German delegation was expected.

In Israel that hot month of June 1973, seven months pregnant, I realize how small is the minority of Germans I represent, even though the battle I am waging is also that of Israel, and even though I am a better friend of Israel than a great number of Herr Brandt's friends.

But there were some who were interested to meet with me: Benjamin Halevi, a member of the Knesset and one of the three judges in the Eichmann trial, became the spokesman for our cause and intervened effectively with Golda Meir and Abba Eban. So did Haika Grossman, member of the Knesset for the Mapam. Menachim Beigin, the former commander of Irgun and now minority leader of the Knesset, invited me to his modest apartment in Tel Aviv and gave me warm assurances of his movement's support for diplomatic intervention with Bonn. The former Resistance and partisans gave a dinner in my honor at Tel Aviv
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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