WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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out of windows, police cars appeared. I moved off to avoid being arrested and brought to the hospital a youth who had been cut.

The police finally managed to get the group into their cars. Julien and Henri, in concentration-camp clothing, resisted; they were dragged along the ground. In the car, a policeman sadistically twisted Henri's arm until his colleagues made him stop. They had no sooner arrived at the police station than he fell upon Henri and Julien and punched them in the stomach. What moral courage Julien and Henri displayed in coming back to Germany, only to be beaten by policemen thirty years younger than those who had tortured them at Auschwitz! All this to obtain a hypothetical ratification!

The following day, after a night in a cell, they were tried and practically acquitted. They were penalized only for the actual damage they had caused – a fine of 2000 marks. Once again the judges had bowed.

As for the 2000 marks, they were never paid, nor were any other fines. The firm, Krücken, where Lischka has his power base, demanded that they be paid through the account of a French grain merchant in Lorraine. Julien asked a good friend of his in Metz, Henri Ormont, to inquire into the firm that does business with Lischka's. It turns out that the head of the firm is Jewish and related to Ormont. Ormont lays down the law to his relative, who is somewhat annoyed at having to refuse to accommodate Krücken, a good customer. But he finally writes a polite letter to Krücken that he cannot use his account as requested as he has "learned about the nature of the proposed transaction."

Julien Aubart and Henri Pudeleau belong to the National Union of Deportees, Internees, and War Victims (UNDIVG), whose president is a valorous Basque resister, René Clavel, who fought the enemy in Tunisia and Vercors before being deported to KZ Dora. The UNDIVG is a fraternal organization. Thanks to these friends, the financial burden of our action is lightened. Willy Brandt replied to René Clavel in February 1973: "I hope the accord will be ratified before the parliamentary recess." But more is needed than the good will of Brandt.

On June 13, Julien and Serge went to Bonn. They met with Günther Metzger, vice-chairman of the Social-Democratic parliamentary group and a friend of Israel. They handed him fifty copies of a well-documented dossier covering Achenbach, who was on the
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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