WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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meant. At any rate, we had kept within the law and furnished the proper authorities with data, and so far had not met with the press.

On the previous evening Ambassador Jean-Louis Mandereau had met with the Foreign Minister, and the official request for extradition, in the proper form, had reached La Paz. On the same day Ambassador Mandereau saw us, and we brought him up to date. He let fall a remark that made me wonder whether he really understood the problem: "Because of you, I have had to take all the passion out of this matter and make it entirely a legal one."

"Mister Ambassador," I replied, "Barbie's torture of Jean Moulin was the Passion of the French Resistance."

Without translators (the German Embassy had translated into Spanish the German documents that were in the French dossier), without a press attaché to tell the Bolivian newspapers about the yoke the Nazis had imposed on France, and without energetic leadership, the French Embassy in La Paz hardly seemed in accord with President Pompidou's "forceful and urgent" letter, so well translated into Spanish through the efforts of the French Embassy that the Bolivian authorities are still smiling over it.

On Saturday, February 26, I tactfully sounded out the reporters. They had instructions not to say anything about our presence. Only one concrete happening and they would have a chance to publicize what we had to say and show. My idea of a press conference delighted them, especially since I proposed showing the film of the program on which Barbie's victims identified him from the Ladislas de Hoyos interview, as shown on ORTF television in Paris. Then I had to dash around madly but discreetly to find an adequate projector.

On Sunday, while we were walking on the Prado, Mme. Halaunbrenner suddenly heard two women chatting in Yiddish, and lost no time in introducing herself. Her new friends were already aware of why we were there, and invited us to luncheon and to spend the afternoon in their home.

On Monday morning I summoned all the reporters by telephone to a press conference at 11 A.M. I had to act quickly; if I waited until afternoon, the police might stop everything. At 10:15 half a dozen plainclothesmen entered the hotel. Two came up to me in the lobby and asked me to follow them to police headquarters. I went upstairs to get a few things from my room, and found two policemen standing guard outside it. I telephoned our
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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