WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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and the German authorities. The demonstration made about one-tenth the stir it could have caused.

Upstairs in the chambers of Public Prosecutor Manfred Ludolph, the delegates submitted to him a "for your immediate attention" memorandum, which "solemnly requested" him to reopen the investigation. Ludolph listened politely, for he was under no real pressure, and he had been given no document capable of causing the original decision to be re-examined. So he promised nothing.

Meanwhile Mme. Benguigui and I had got inside the building, but since I could not get in to see Ludolph, I left him the file of documents Barbie had signed and that we had found at the CDJC, as well as Schendel's affidavit.

The delegation then headed for Dachau, as planned. I had arranged with the Association of German Victims of Nazism to hold a press conference. There was not enough time before the 5:30 P.M. plane to do both. Those who wanted to go to Dachau argued with those, including me, who wanted action to take priority regardless of what happened. The purpose of the delegation still had to be explained to the German public.

One of the Resistance veterans almost came to blows with one of the young people. "What do you mean accusing me of just being a tourist?" he demanded. "I was fighting in the Resistance before you were even born." It was the same old argument, and it showed that the speaker did not believe in the future of the Resistance spirit.

In the end, there was a press conference, and the delegation went back to Lyon, where they were met at the airport as if they were returning Argonauts by the mayor, the local elected officials, a television crew, and many townspeople.

Mme. Benguigui and I were the only ones who stayed behind, ready to act, for the situation demanded it. Two women – one French and one German. Our ammunition: the only picture of her three children Mme. Benguigui had, which I had had enlarged, and two signs I had made in our hotel room. Our plan was simple: on the following day we would stand on the street before the courthouse steps, where Mme. Benguigui would hold up her children's picture and declare that she was beginning a hunger strike. The people of Munich would doubtless respond, and so would the papers and television. Mme. Benguigui and I were going to stage a trial of strength with the prosecutor's court, however laughable our means of doing so.
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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