WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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mother of a six-year-old boy; "You'd be better off taking care of your child," and, "Why don't you stay in your kitchen?" But B.K. does not want to limit her world to a kitchen and a child. She believes her dedication to Germany's past is only right, and she has taken the consequences. "I will not retreat," she says. That is how she differs from other women. She has staked her whole middle-class security on what she is doing. Her actions have made her name famous and provoked fierce arguments. Such dedication seems as natural to the Klarsfeld family as cooking or bringing up children. That's how they differ from other families.

I resumed my relations with the Cologne reporters, who got in touch with Dr. Bellinghausen, the examining magistrate. I learned then that for the time being no warrant was out for Serge's or my arrest. But Der Spiegel had just published quite a long article on the subject.

To intensify the pressure, we decided to send all our data on Lischka and Hagen to the German courts. I asked Ralph Feigelson, a French Resistance fighter who had been sent to Auschwitz, to take the papers to the examining magistrate in Cologne dressed in his concentration-camp uniform with all his decorations pinned to his chest. Ralph's fine physique and impressive beard made him very photogenic. He would be a good subject for the German reporters, and I was counting on this more than on their interest in the data. By photographing him they would give the impression all over Germany that the Resistance and Deportees associations in France were behind me.

Ralph Feigelson was to go to the Press Building in Cologne, and from there reporters who had been alerted by me were to accompany him to the Cologne court. But on the afternoon of March 3l, a few hours before he left, I telephoned Cologne and learned that when the reporters had questioned Bellinghausen about why there was no warrant out for my arrest, he had said: "I am under no obligation to believe what I read in the papers."

At that moment I realized that the German courts, which were being hesitant about issuing a warrant because they did not want the scandal to spread, could be caught in a trap. If I were to go in person to Bellinghausen, my provocation could get things moving. There would be a test of strength. If he let me go free, he would prove that the impunity war criminals like Lischka and Hagen enjoy in the Federal Republic is such an outrage that they cannot
     
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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