WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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November 19, 1942. Memorandum from Hagen on his talk the previous evening with Bousquet. Once again he called to Bousquet's attention the necessity of settling the Jewish problem once and for all, especially now that the Americans have landed in North Africa.

December 16, 1942. Memorandum from Hagen to Oberg and Knochen: under the title of "Night and Fog" arrange for the arrest of French intellectuals.

January 9, 1943. Memorandum from Hagen to Knochen that Bousquet is running into difficulties in effecting anti-Jewish measures owing to Italian interference.

February 4, 1943. Memorandum from Hagen: The Italians do not want Jews residing in their zone to be treated like French Jews. Achenbach, of the German Embassy, has been informed.

January 23, 1943. Hagen and Oberg direct the destruction of Marseille's Vieux Port.

March 25, 1943. Bousquet's deputy, Leguay, explains to Hagen Vichy's new reluctance to deport Jews. Hagen comments: "When I complained that such an attitude was surprising, since it had to do with Jews, Leguay explained that without wanting to express a pro-Jewish sentiment both Pétain and Laval, out of humanitarian considerations, could not take the responsibility for shipping Jews to Germany.

"I emphasized to him my personal opinion that this attitude seemed all the more surprising in that the Führer in all his speeches during the last few years – and especially in his speech on the day of commemoration of fallen heroes had stressed a radical solution of the Jewish problem. I promised him at the end that I would advise S.S.-Brigadeführer Oberg of Laval's decision and inform him at once of the result.

"S.S.-Brigadeführer Oberg decided that shipments are to be made with the help of the German police alone. This decision was transmitted to Leguay as follows: S.S. Brigadeführer Oberg expressed great surprise that the French government had still not abandoned its 'sentimental' point of view about the Jewish question in spite of the Führer's latest policy statement. He is therefore obliged to handle the shipments himself."

April 12, 1943. Memorandum from Hagen on his talk with Bousquet about the project for denaturalizing French Jews.

June 12, 1943. A conference was held at Hagen's house, at which
     
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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