WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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[ar…] rested since the Vel d'Hiver round up. In the end the children were deported.

Hagen also participated in numerous talks with French authorities about the Jewish problem. Following are some reports on them that he wrote and signed. The first, dated June 18, 1942, and the most innocuous, exempts "the wife of de Brinon, the wife of the philosopher Bergson, the wife of the writer Jouvenel, and the wife of the writer Caulette" [Hagen apparently thought Colette – "Caulette" – was a man] from wearing the yellow star.

June 26-29. Talks between Oberg, Knochen, Hagen, and Dannecker with Secretary General of the Police Bousquet and his deputies: 22,000 Jews from the occupied zone will be delivered to Dannecker, who will receive Jews from the southern zone whom the French have deemed undesirable.

July 4, 1942. German side: Knochen, Hagen, Schmidt; French side: Bousquet, Darquier de Pellepoix, Wilhelm. Vichy agrees that starting July 13 stateless Jews will be deported from the two zones.

July 4, 1942. Talk between Knochen, Hagen, and Bousquet. Vichy will set up a special police force to deal with Jews, communists, and Freemasons. Its headquarters will have its own budget. Insofar as the arrest of Jews in the occupied zone is concerned, Laval would prefer that the Germans handle it. French police, however, will arrest foreign Jews.

August 1, 1942. Talk between Knochen, Hagen, and Bousquet. Hagen notes: Bousquet assures that the first 3,000 Jews from the southern zone will be handed over to the Germans before August 10. Pétain and Laval would agree to the Germans' demand for the denaturalization of Jews who became French citizens after 1933.

August 3, 1942. Talk between Laval and Bousquet, and Knochen and Hagen. Laval agrees to the principle of depriving Jews of citizenship.

September 2, 1942. Hagen is present at the talk between Laval and Oberg. He notes that Laval will do his best, but cannot promise to deliver Jews "like goods in a Woolworth's." The two parties agree that in the future it will be announced that deported Jews have been sent to forced labor in Poland.

September 20, 1942. Memorandum from Hagen on his talk the previous evening with Bousquet. The authority of the General Commissioner for the Jewish Problem will be increased. Seven thousand Jews have already been arrested in the non-occupied zone, and will soon be turned over to the Germans.
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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