WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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The ways Jews have of distrusting one another is apparently not the determining factor in Palestine's economic chaos . . . . The Jews' complete inability to manage their country's economy is demonstrated by the existence in Jerusalem alone of some forty banks that thrive by swindling their own people.

Another illustration of that mentality is Hagen's refusal, on February 9, 1938, to entrust the Jews of the Fulda-Werra area to S.S. Officer Heinrich: "His youth and his lack of toughness render him unfit to tackle Frankfurt's 20,000 Jews."

By means of carefully thought out plans, Section II-112, inspired by Hagen and Eichmann, who frequently made tours through Central Europe, made a worldwide study of Jewish organizations and set up a network of spies in Paris, New York, Cairo, Jerusalem, Prague, and Bucharest. Section II-112 also compiled a remarkable set of records and methods that were to be used by the Reich throughout conquered Europe and would allow it to take over various Jewish communities by methods that were so efficient that historians of the Holocaust are still astonished at them.

In October 1938, Hagen went to Vienna and Prague, where he advised the leaders of Czech anti Semitism that the time was opportune for them to create a general antipathy toward Jews. In May 1939, after the occupation, he went back to Prague. On June 30, he advised: "Show the influence Jews have on politics, culture, and the Czech economy. In that way government leaders who are tolerant of such influence can be spotted – a good chance for getting rid of Czech nationals still in political power. Demonstrate that a converted Jew is still the same as ever."

Section II-112 also saw to it that anti Jewish measures in Germany were strictly enforced.

Hagen was an expert on France, and spoke French extremely well. In November 1938, Hagen expressed his satisfaction with the way his department had cooperated with the chief of the corresponding department of the Gestapo, Section II-B-4, which Kurt Lischka directed, in the anti-Jewish developments of that month – including the Week of the Broken Glass.

During the early days of the war, Himmler reassigned the directors of his RSHA, which was both a government and an S.S. department Hagen thereafter directed Section VI-2, devoted to "Judaism and anti Semitism." In June 1940, S.S.-Standartenführer Helmut Knochen arrived in
     
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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