WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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He turned in another direction and crossed the street so as to put about ten yards between him and us. We ran toward him. Lischka certainly must have been afraid to be photographed in the presence of people who would ask him why on the streetcar. Perhaps he thought we would really harm him. At any rate, he turned down a street perpendicular to the streetcar line, quickening his pace but still keeping his dignity. Then his long legs moved faster, and we had to film him from a distance of several yards. At this moment there occurred the sort of thing one sees in movies. Lischka stopped, then began to zigzag. We kept up with him, the camera turning all the while. He was fleeing just as he had made so many of his victims do.

I felt I was watching a pogrom in which he was the persecuted Jew. Lischka, the once supreme persecutor, was fleeing in his own city and down his own streets; he had suddenly been confronted with his past.

We had filmed a remarkable sequence that was to stir up great excitement when it was shown in Israel.
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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