WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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HARASSING
THE BUNDESTAG

the attempted kidnapping of Lischka took place on March 22, 1971, but it was before my trip to Czechoslovakia that I had become interested in bringing to justice the German war criminals who had abused France. The Brandt government was to sign a new legal convention with France that would place a time limit on the impunity of those criminals.

In January 1971, S.S.-General Hans Lammerding had died. He was the most notorious of the Germans who had been convicted in absentia in France and gone unpunished. Lammerding was responsible for innumerable massacres of civilians in the Soviet Union, and he had used the same tactics in France in June 1944. His division – "Das Reich" – left behind it two names that the French equate with Nazi barbarism: Oradour-sur-Glane and Tulle. Lammerding was made chief of staff to S.S.-Reichsführer Heinrich Himmler, who functioned not only as Minister of the Interior but also as commander in chief of the territorial army. After 1945, Lammerding was to benefit from an unusual situation that also benefited a great majority of the German torturers and assassins who had operated in France. I was enraged that Lammerding had succeeded in staying out of the reach of justice, and so I tried to learn what had prevented and was still preventing the trials of Nazi
     
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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