WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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can't send me back to Czechoslovakia, because they won't have me there. I don't want to stay in Austria. I just want to get to Vienna so that I can take a plane."

The whole situation reminded me of Charlie Chaplin in "The Pilgrim," with one foot on the American side of the border and a sheriff after him, and his other foot on the Mexican side, where bandits are waiting for him. Here I was, with one foot in each of two camps, wanted by neither, and facing as much trouble from the East as from the West.

At 6 A.M. Vienna replied that I could enter Austria. I reached the capital by bus and train, and telephoned Paris to reassure my mother-in-law, who told me that Serge had gone to Bonn as we had planned. I got a plane to Frankfurt and transferred to another for Cologne, where I found Serge at about 4 P.M. He had had to release the news of my arrest on Monday himself, for the reporters had not been able to get their stories past the censor. Serge had telephoned the Hotel Flora in Prague, but no one there could tell him anything except that I had checked out. Since he knew from my telegram that I had been in touch with the Western press correspondents, he called their Paris branches and asked them to find out from their Prague representatives what had happened to me. That is how he learned of my arrest, and on Tuesday the newspapers carried the story. Perhaps that had some bearing on my being expelled.

A few days later the French Trotskyites demonstrated against the trial of their comrades in Prague by occupying the Czech Consulate and holding a press conference there. The Prague Trotskyites would doubtless have preferred their foreign comrades to express their solidarity on the spot, even at the risk of sharing their fate.

On March 2, in one of his customary local broadcasts, Husak criticized my "bad behavior" in Prague, doubtless because the anti-communist Radio Free Europe had made such a big thing of it and because I had given an interview, broadcast to Czechoslovakia, explaining the reasons for my action.

It is not up to me to entertain, but to tell the truth as forcefully as I can – brutally, if necessary. Forbidden to stay in the German Democratic Republic, I was soon to be arrested in the Federal Republic.
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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