WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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I talked with wanted to avoid discussing what was on my mind. But when I showed them the leaflet I had distributed in Warsaw, the old Resistance people across the table from me changed their tone at once. One of them said in embarrassment:

"Yes, we heard about what you did. Everyone is talking about it in private, but very few wish to discuss it openly. Many of your friends approve of it, because for a long time there has been some uneasiness that became especially apparent after the anniversary ceremonies at Auschwitz and the Warsaw ghetto. Only delegates from the Eastern countries showed up at them. We have tried to remedy the situation through discussions with our Polish friends, but nothing has come of them."

My relations with East Germany got worse and worse. I tried to go back with Serge one more time. We were made to wait at the frontier for two hours and then were told that we could no longer enter East Germany.

I had been ostracized. But a few weeks after my protest, Chancellor Brandt of the Federal Republic also chose concrete action as a means of expression when he visited Poland. He knelt at the memorial to the Warsaw ghetto, thereby greatly displeasing the Poles and many Germans to boot.

Later, when Brandt won the Nobel Peace Prize after negotiating the treaties that restored relations between the Federal Republic and the USSR and Poland, tears I could not repress came to my eyes. Of everything I have undertaken, the one thing that has given me the most joy is that for four years I did my best to get Willy Brandt recognition. For once in my life I had confidence in a politician. Brandt's vigorous and courageous policy toward the East and his easing of human contacts between the West Berliners and the East Germans have already found a place in history.

The sudden change of attitude on the part of the East German authorities did nothing to alter my deep convictions. I continued to think that the final solution of the German problem was recognition of the two states of the German nation. For Germany not to be a member of the United Nations seemed lamentable to me. It was high time for both the Federal Republic and the Democratic Republic to join it simultaneously.

Several weeks later I was to testify to that opinion on the occasion of the twenty fifth anniversary of the San Francisco Charter,
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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