WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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ulterior motives that both Brandt and the East German leaders who accompanied him had paid to their countrymen whom Hitler had murdered. For the two Germanys, it was not formal ritual but a true return to their common origin.

When Willy Brandt came out, I took the armful of flowers the East German leaders had given me down into the crypt and laid them beside Brandt's wreath. My eyes fell on the inscription on one of the walls: "Our goal is the destruction of Nazism and its roots."

On May 24, I attended the second summit meeting between West and East Germans in Kassel in the Federal Republic. The change in German relations had not caught me unawares. My reasoning was derived from a simple premise: no great people had long remained divided. The Jewish people had recovered their homeland after two millenniums in spite of persecution and numerical weakness; the German people would regain their oneness.

It was not a utopian notion. To believe the division would last forever is unrealistic. From that point of view I had to bear witness in the East as well as in the West – and not in words alone, but in action – that the Germans in the East as well as in the West are subject to moral imperatives that must take precedence over any commitment to their respective ideologies. After what happened under Nazism, should not Germany as a whole fight against anti-Semitism, labor to get former active Nazis out of high political positions, and oppose the rehabilitation of Nazi criminals?

That is why I would react so strongly when Ernst Achenbach was about to be appointed to the Executive Committee of the EEC in April 1970. In compiling an exposé of his activities under Hitler and stirring up international public opinion against him, I was as powerfully motivated as I was during my campaign against Kiesinger. It was the same when I went to Austria to oppose the appointment of Hans Schirmer as the Federal Republic's ambassador to Vienna.

Hans Schirmer joined the Nazi party as No. 3,143,496 on May 1, 1933. An executive in Goebbel's Propaganda Ministry, he was Kiesinger's superior from 1939 to 1943 as Chief Deputy in the Foreign Ministry's Political Broadcasting Department. In addition, Schirmer was a director of Radio-Mundial, a secret international network that broadcast the idea of a "new Europe" throughout the world.
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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