WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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White House for reasons of security." The press interpreted this as meaning that there was fear I would put personal pressure on Brandt about Achenbach.

At any rate, on Thursday the 9th, the international press reacted as we had hoped it would. The Hamburg daily, Die Welt, headlined: "Achenbach's Candidacy Attacked in Paris and Brussels – B.K. Touring Europe Again." The Munich Süddeutsche Zeitung: "B.K. on the Move to Expose Achenbach's Past." The Hannoversche Presse: "B.K. Attacks Achenbach." In Italy, Il Messagero's headline on the day after a meeting in Rome between Scheel and Foreign Minister Aldo Moro was: "Astonishment and Anger in Brussels Over a Nazi EEC Candidate." The Brussels Le Soir wrote:
The German Foreign Minister's usual self confidence, which has so easily and efficiently allayed the hostility of other European countries, seems to have considerably diminished. At any rate, it appears that Achenbach insists there is no difference between Hitler's Europe and the Common Market's, and that he thinks the expertise he acquired in the former is enough to recommend him for the latter.

Instead of flying to Washington, I spent the day in the Bonn Press Building going from one office to another with my data while Arno ran up and down the corridors. I left an exposé with Horst Ehmke, the Chancellery minister who had given me the helpful advice during the 1968 Kiesinger affair: "Don't treat it as a legal matter; make it political."

In the evening we left for Paris and arrived on April 10. We went back to work at once in the CDJC archives. As far as the press and public opinion were concerned, the whole Achenbach case rested on one document: the notorious telegram Achenbach sent on February 1, 1943, to the Foreign Ministry in Berlin. It said:
On February 13, 1943, about 11:10 P.M., Lieutenant Colonel Winkler and Major Nussbaum, Chief of Staff of the Luftwaffe's Third Division, were shot from behind while walking from their office to their hotel a short distance from the Louvre Bridge over the Seine, which they had just crossed. Winkler was wounded by three bullets; Nussbaum by two. They died the same night. Seven 7.65 mm. cartridges were found near the scene of the crime, and presumably came from the same gun. The whereabouts of the assassins is being investigated. The first reprisal will be the arrest and deportation of 2,000 Jews
     
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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