WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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for Brussels. Luns, however, was sufficiently impressed by my report to intervene personally a short time later with his German colleague, Scheel.

The Dutch press reported on my television interview, and the Belgian press followed suit. La Libre Belgique headlined: "Will There Be an Achenbach Affair?" Its three-column story ended: "Opponents of Achenbach's candidacy find it inconceivable for him to have a seat on the executive level and play a major role in economic, political, and social decisions. To accept Achenbach is equivalent to seating Abetz on the European Committee of the EEC. We definitely share this point of view and hope the Belgian government will react as it should to his candidacy."

Serge had left for Brussels on the same morning to meet EEC officials who wanted to learn more about our report. Arno went with him, for my mother-in-law had no time to take care of him. Of course that had to be the day he had a terrible toothache, and Serge had to interrupt his interviews to rub the boy's gums with honey syrup.

I reached Brussels early in the afternoon and set Serge free. He sat himself down at a photocopier and began reproducing copies of our reports. Arno and I went to the Belgian Prime Minister's. Prime Minister Eykens, after reading our report, told Der Spiegel: "This is an unfortunate business."

While I was talking with the Prime Minister's chief of staff, his office staff took care of Arno. I shall never forget the look on their faces when they said: "If you have to put up with him all day long, we don't envy you."

That same evening Serge, Arno, and I left for Bonn.

In addition to my approach to the German government about Achenbach, I was also supposed to fly to the United States as one of the journalists who were accompanying Brandt on his first official trans Atlantic visit. Rüdiger von Wechmar, deputy to government spokesman Conrad Ahlers, had succeeded in getting me invited. But two days before I was supposed to leave I got a telegram cancelling [sic] my trip. The right-wing press thought that it would be extremely discourteous to Kiesinger and cause an inquiry in the Bundestag if the woman who had slapped Kiesinger were to accompany the new Chancellor in an official capacity. Another reason, according to the telegram, was: "The CIA and the U.S. State Department cannot allow Beate Klarsfeld into the
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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