WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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had protested up until then simply because they lacked the energy.

Once we had the basic data ready, I undertook to circulate it. I took it first to the politicians, sending a copy to the president of the EEC; to the Foreign Ministries of The Netherlands, Italy, and Luxemburg; to Willy Brandt; to the Prime Ministers of Belgium and Great Britain. In Paris I went to the Elysée Palace, where a deputy took my report and promised to give it the "careful examination it deserved." I also went to the Quai d'Orsay, and there is no doubt that Foreign Minister Maurice Schumann studied the documents I left there for his attention. Some months later, on June 23, he replied to the letter in which I had asked him to take action for the exclusion of Achenbach from the Franco-German parliamentary group: "I will seize the first opportunity available to me for making known our joint feelings."

But the politicians will budge only if the press creates a stir. So, to get the press moving, I had to meet several conditions: first, see that they had copies of the report; second, create a situation that would give reporters and commentators a reason for expressing their opinion. One writer on foreign affairs told me: "You push Achenbach out a window, and I'll print your report."

I spent all of April 4 going to the international press services, the big French dailies, and representatives of the most important European papers. I did not just leave my report with them, but discussed it and tried to get them to accept my interpretation of Achenbach's possible appointment.

I made long telephone calls to two friends in Brussels: Philippe Lemaître, who covered the Common Market for Le Monde, and a young German woman who was an executive in its inner circles. Some of her associates had reacted violently when they learned that Achenbach was about to represent the Federal Republic.

Wilhelm Haferkamp, the other German commissioner in Brussels, took advantage of a mission to Jerusalem to look for documents that were more compromising to Achenbach in the Yad Vashem archives, a center of information on victims of Nazism. Unfortunately he found none, and so he sent a young member of his staff to Paris. The young man got in touch with Serge and returned to Brussels with a briefcase bulging with documents. These so convinced Haferkamp that on April 15 he went to work in earnest against Achenbach.

But to return to the situation in Brussels on April 4, during the course of some fierce arguments with my friends we reached a
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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