WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
Previous Page Back  Contents  Contents Page 87 Home Page Home Page  Forward Next Page 
     
My lawyers also refused to plead. Then everything happened very quickly. The court adjourned to deliberate, and returned with the verdict everyone expected – except Prosecutor Neelsen, who still demanded a year's imprisonment – four months in jail, sentence suspended. (I was later to be pardoned by Brandt when he came to power.) The court explained its leniency by the fact that I had acted "out of conviction."

Serge spent a week of his vacation going back and forth to Hamburg to oversee the printing of a pamphlet with a red cover: Kiesinger or Subtle Fascism, the French edition of my earliest research. We published it ourselves under our rights as authors of the German edition.

On September 8, President Pompidou was paying an official visit to Bonn, an occasion on which Kiesinger's Nazi past once more had to be revealed. On September 5, Serge brought home a big suitcase full of copies that still smelled of the binder's glue. We made the rounds of the ministries, the legislative assemblies, the Elysée Palace, and the government offices to give them to the top politicians in France and to the men who would be going to Bonn with Pompidou. The German correspondents in Paris also received copies, and they wired Bonn that the French officials would be reading B.K.'s book on Kiesinger on the flight to the German capital.

September 7. I reached Bonn. I had asked the Hamburg printer to send me, under my maiden name, a whole carton of the red booklets, and I found it waiting for me at the Bonn railway station. With the help of two young ADF members, I set out to distribute them at the press conference that was to follow the Franco-German talks. Laden with the heavy packages, we arrived at the Press Building a little late.

The guard stopped us. "Where are you going?"

"Günter Diehl, the government spokesman, has instructed us to deliver these books."

We went up to the second floor. About a hundred German and foreign reporters were already in the large conference room. No one paid any attention to us. We slipped in and methodically handed out the booklets, beginning at the rear of the room. The reporters began to get excited. By the time the guards noticed that it was not an official document we were handing out, it was too late. Most of
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
Previous Page  Back Page 87 Forward  Next Page