WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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Kiesinger work had been turned into a pro-Kiesinger tract. Doors slammed. There was no further discussion, only shouting. I telephoned Melzer, who came with a lawyer, but he turned out to be so soft that we got rid of him. We dangled a carrot on a stick before Bingel in the form of threats and a check for two thousand marks. He gave in. The book was rescued.

August 14. With Arno, I started on a three day tour of my electoral district, for Kiesinger was going to campaign there over the weekend.

I had telephoned from Paris for a group with a car in which I could follow Kiesinger's procession. We got five young men and an Opel-Kapitän, and later a Volkswagen bus lent by a sympathetic dairyman to carry six young people, pamphlets, posters, and the tomatoes and eggs we intended to throw. Our first stop was Uhlingen.

The little village was touching in its simplicity, set in a smiling valley with rows of red-roofed cottages framed by dark pines. The platform that had been set up in the little square was hung with evergreen boughs, flags, and garlands of flowers. It was a real holiday for the seven hundred fifty inhabitants.

The border patrol's big helicopter almost turned over when it landed on the meadow next to the Hotel Alte Post. Kiesinger's appearance was the cue for a fanfare and for girls in local costume to march up to him with armfuls of flowers.

We parked our cars. When we got out of them with our ammunition and our shabbily dressed, bearded youngsters, people looked at us as though we were visitors from another planet. Arno had to go to the bathroom, so I took him into the hotel. There I found some ten persons talking together. When they turned around, I saw that they were reporters. "Ah," they exclaimed. "So Frau Klarsfeld has kept her word. This will be an interesting stop."

The better to interrupt the rally, we stood on a bench. As soon as Kiesinger began to speak, we shouted in chorus: "Nazi!" Arno, teetering on his perch, joined in gleefully. Suddenly some myrmidons of the law who had sneaked up behind us tipped over the bench on which we were standing. Kiesinger lost patience at this interruption and shouted angrily: "It's always the same faces. Point them out clearly so that everyone can see who they are. I have nothing against my opponents, but if those people want to destroy the State, we are not going to let them do it."
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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