WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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wanted to use it in my election campaign. From Berlin I went to Frankfurt, then to two rallies in Lebenstadt and Hanover, before returning to Paris on the 30th. How could I keep all this up until October?

June 21. I put the finishing touches on my manuscript in the Potsdam Archives. When I got back to Paris, I learned that the twentieth session of the World Peace Congress in East Berlin had awarded me the Gregory Lambrakis Medal. Not being completely informed about the true situation in Germany, the authors of the citation accompanying the medal which shows the hero of "Z" – inscribed it: "For her courage and the fight she has made for national independence." I was nontheless [sic] much moved to be so honored as a German woman.

June 30. Bremerhaven. The ADF leaders here had given my arrival a great deal of publicity: posters and pamphlets. We drove to Bremen with Arno, arriving with an hour to spare. We wanted to inspect the sound equipment in the Nordseehotel, which the ADF had hired. Herr Naber, one of the hotel owners, met us at the door and announced: "I have cancelled the rental of the hall. B.K. shall not enter my hotel."

He had not shut his doors to the other parties, as the papers pointed out, and had even admitted Admiral Karl Doenitz, Hitler's successor, when that Nazi recently attended a Navy reunion in Bremerhaven.

After four rallies in small towns in the region, we reached Oldenburg, where Kiesinger was to speak at a big rally restricted to members of the Christian Democratic Union. I managed to gather about three hundred young people of the city, which is inhabited mainly by retired officials. There were not enough policemen to stop us from blockading the main door of the Weser-Ems-Hall.

The Chancellor's helicopter landed in an empty lot behind the building surrounded by a high iron fence. Kiesinger got out of it smiling, doubtless under the impression that we were cheering him, and waved to us. In a moment, however, he recognized his mistake, but he seemed determined not to be embarrassed and so continued to smile and wave.

Serge and I were hoisted to the top of a car parked up against the fence and so could see everything that was going on. The booing increased as Kiesinger came nearer. Suddenly there he was, right in front of me. He recognized me at once. His jaw tightened and his
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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