WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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[clandes] tine subsidy from East Germany, but the DVZ editors denied that they had been pressured into hiring me.

January 30. Cologne. My talk on imprisonment while awaiting trial helped warm up the audience. Other speakers dwelt on the fascism that exists in Greece, Spain, and Portugal, for there were immigrant workers in the hall. The young people wanted to go into action, but unfortunately they had no program for doing so. The meeting broke up early. A first division descended on the Greek and Portuguese consulates; windows and doors were broken at the United States Information Agency; the Spanish Railway Office was damaged, as well as a Spanish community center and the Greek Club. Police sirens shrieked throughout the city.

In Frankfurt hundreds of protesters answered the call of the Students for a Democratic Society, which wanted to celebrate in its own way the thirty-sixth anniversary of Hitler's rise to power. There was a gala performance at the opera for the benefit of the Foundation for the Aid of German Sport. The cream of the German establishment was there expecting to have a pleasant evening, even though they could hardly fail to remember the historical event it commemorated. It was a real provocation for the antifascists. Students greeted the Chancellor with shouts of "Sieg heil! Kiesinger is a Nazi! Slap Kiesinger!" They blocked traffic and overturned automobiles. Violence erupted all over West Germany.

January 31. I spoke in the largest auditorium of the University of Hamburg. Two thousand in attendance, and an impressive number of police.

February 1. Duisburg. And freezing cold! I spoke in the Town Hall Square. Fortunately my speech was short, for I had to turn the pages with my glove off and I was getting numb. In the evening I left by car for Dortmund. There I took the night train to Berlin for a meeting at the Free University.

February 3. Serge joined me to help me prepare for the hearing before the Court of Appeals. The election of the President of the Federal Republic took place today. Heinrich Lübke, the former President, had been unseated by Germans from the East and by his own behavior. He had had to resign his position prematurely after having been accused of designing huts for concentration camps. He denied drawing the plans, but handwriting analyses convicted him.
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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