WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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where the conference had just begun. Michel Lang was reading the text of my speech. I was greeted with a frantic ovation.

"We won't let Beate leave!" the students shouted.

Some of them suggested blocking the campus gates at 4 P.M. so that I would be protected from the police, but I refused to let them. Once I had finished speaking, a delegation of students got the police to extend my stay until 6 P.M., which gave me time to talk at length with Der Spiegel's correspondent.

Kiesinger delivered his speech that evening. The Belgian students staged a demonstration that I learned about from the newspapers the next morning in Paris. Kiesinger had been deeply humiliated before the Belgian government, Prime Minister Gaston Eyskens, Foreign Minister Pierre Harmel, NATO Secretary General Manlio Brosio and other officials, the Common Market directors, and the entire diplomatic corps – all of which, of course, was reported in Germany, where the press emphasized that it was the second time in less than a week that Kiesinger had been insulted at my instigation.

The following day, the Munich Süddeutsche Zeitung ran a cartoon that summed up the situation: an airplane in flight and below it a witch on a broomstick trailing a streamer that read "Beate Klarsfeld." The cartoon was captioned, "The Chancellor's Advance Guard." The Germans were beginning to realize the embarrassment to which they were exposed by keeping on as Chancellor a man whose reputation was being assailed not only in Germany but outside of Germany as well. The influential weekly Die Zeit emphasized this by stressing that Kiesinger's stock and his image were in a decline, and that a crisis had just occurred. It attributed this in a large degree to the Berlin and Brussels incidents. According to some reporters who had access to the Chancellor at that time, the Belgian ordeal had been much more painful to him than the one in Berlin.

November 15. Paris. German reporters stormed our apartment in order to see how "that hysterical young woman who goes around with university hooligans," as Kiesinger had described me, lived. They seemed to think they would find the place in a mess, but everything was impeccable. As soon as they came in they were impressed by our large foyer and our three rooms overlooking the Seine; in fact, they were so amazed that they mistook the repro […ductions]
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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