WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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For eleven months after the slap – until Kiesinger's defeat in the September 1969 elections – I was to be constantly on the move.

The hardest part for me was to be away when Arno was sick with the flu, the mumps, or the measles. Raissa kept lecturing me and pretending she did not want to take care of Arno so that I would stay home. But I had to leave. If I were to give in and cancel a demonstration or a speech, I might lose momentum. So I would kiss Arno's fevered brow and, with a heavy heart, leave on the night trains that would save me precious time.


How many times Serge and I would part at the Gare du Nord or the Gare de l'Est with a tender kiss that gave me the strength to go on! How many times I would wake up dry mouthed in a train compartment as another gray German morning was breaking. How many times I would feel almost physical exhaustion when I thought of how vast the country was and when I looked at the gigantic factories, the innumerable cars, and all those strange men and women whose political awareness I was trying to arouse. At those moments what I wanted to achieve seemed so unreal, so unattainable, that I would ask myself whether it was worth sacrificing so much energy and so many of the comforts of home for it.
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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