WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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[Euro…] pean countries, that would determine the future of Europe. There was at last a good chance for Brandt's Social Democrats to take over in the near future and adopt a foreign policy different from the Christian Democrats'. To me, a bet on that game was much safer than a bet on the one surging through the streets of Paris.

On May 29, half a dozen youths and I occupied the OFA building. From the windows we hung three big banners: Franco-German Alliance for Youth Occupied – No Emergency Laws for Germany – Solidarity between French and German Students and Workers.

Robert Clément, the director of the French wing of the OFA, made no objection. General de Gaulle had left Paris, and Clément was not sure whether the government would fall. Those twenty-four hours of peaceful occupation were punctuated by the appearance of numerous youth organization leaders appealing for financial support from the OFA or wanting to hold structured dialogues on the OFA's future and necessary changes in its procedures. My former co-workers were shocked to see me blithely leading the attack on the offices where only a few months earlier I had been pounding a typewriter. They expected me to be arrested, but I wasn't.


During the summer of 1968, I applied myself to publicizing facts about German politics in a series of articles for Combat. On September 2, I wrote:
The key to European security and peace and to the liberalization of Eastern Europe is the reunification of Germany into a truly socialistic, democratic, and pacifistic nation. So long as the German people refuse frankly to acknowledge their responsibility for the tragedy that made Europe what it is today, so long as they will not expel from government positions the survivors and the putrescent odors of the Third Reich, and so long as a healthy national attitude continues to be confused with pan-Germanic expansion and the lust for power, so long as the monopolies that rule its economic and intellectual life are not reduced in authority, the status quo in Europe will remain an intangible reality. All this is happening in a world in which disasters far more bloody than Prague's seem barely to rouse the conscience of the good-for-nothings in the capitalist and the communist blocs. These have rigidly assumed an insufferable attitude of defiance toward each other, even though they have duties to perform far more edifying than recourse to arms, as well as responsibilities toward the Third World proportional to its problems. In order to shatter that confrontation, in order to avoid letting Europe relapse into a total cold war as
     
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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