WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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[appre…] hension on his staff. "You can understand that Brandt, as Chancellor Kiesinger's Foreign Minister and a member of the coalition government, could not give you that interview. If he did, he would seem to be endorsing your campaign."

On February 14, on its page devoted to opinions it did not necessarily endorse, Combat published my article entitled: "The CDU-SPD Coalition Is Virtually Doomed." I published articles in Combat fairly regularly because of the obligation I felt to make the French know how I felt about developments in German politics. It was by no means a fruitless effort. Since there were very few French correspondents in Bonn, the French got little information about Germany.

I returned to the subject still more forcefully on March 22, 1968:
The reunification of Germany is both right and desirable. Furthermore, it is inevitable. But we want no unification that might endanger the rest of the world. We want a peaceful reunification that will make a non-nuclear-power Germany an indispensable bridge between the East and the West. We want a reunification along socialistic lines because that is the only kind of regime that will be acceptable to the two states that now represent the German nation. The French should beware of being fooled by a new order in Europe. They should, therefore, while there is yet time, help the genuine German socialists mount a true opposition and thereby, let us hope, set up a strong government.

Nine o'clock in the morning, March 20, 1968. I had reached West Berlin after a three week trip through the German Democratic Republic, which I thought I ought to get to know thoroughly. Timidly I rang the doorbell at Theology Professor Gollwitzer's house, where Rudi Dutschke had taken refuge. The household was still asleep. After several fruitless attempts, and many long waits in the headquarters of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), I had made up my mind to take him by surprise just as he was getting out of bed.

I wanted the students' help in advancing my campaign against Kiesinger in Germany itself, for I knew it would be hard, if not impossible, to conduct it from Paris. My first meetings with members of the Federation of Socialist Students in Berlin had not been very productive. They were unable to understand, for they thought it natural for a former Nazi to have been elevated by German capitalist interests to the leadership of the Federal Republic. That was only logical in a situation they wanted to attack in its entirety.
     
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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