WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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The broadcasting department was dominated by Luther's attitude. It dealt with matters more from an ideological than a diplomatic point of view. Kiesinger was not a traditional diplomat in the Foreign Ministry; he was closer to those who were developing under the alarming shadow of the Party and especially of the S.S.

According to a decree of September 8, 1939, the broadcasting of propaganda over stations in Germany or in occupied countries was entrusted to Ribbentrop. The department was charged above all with influencing or directing foreign radio stations and, should the need arise, acquiring them so that they might also disseminate Nazi ideas.

In July and August 1940, Kiesinger led a foreign newspapermen's tour of France. In his report on August 21, 1940, he wrote:
Their news stories were intended, first, to impress their readers with the invincibility of German arms in the war and, secondly, to show the behavior and attitude of the victor during the war and after the battles. In addition we had to demonstrate clearly to all readers, especially to those in Southeast Asia and Latin America, where France is considered Europe's leading nation in politics and culture, that such an image was false . . . . The news stories on the attitude of the German soldier in France demonstrated what the victors had accomplished, the importance of the reconstruction work they were doing, and the extraordinary achievements of the Nazi welfare administration in meeting the needs of the population and of returning refugees. . . . Once I had the opportunity to deliver a little lecture at Strasbourg on the history of Alsace Lorraine, which was well received.
Kiesinger's superiors appreciated his efforts right from the start. There was a twelve-point program that all stations under German control were to implement, which Gerhard Rühle, the director of the department, signed on September 26, 1941, before sending it on to Hitler. As a matter of fact, the text was typed on a special large-type machine to spare Hitler the trouble of looking for his glasses. Kiesinger, Hans Schirmer, Markus Timmler, and others of Rühle's associates compiled the program. It was Kiesinger's job to see that each station adapted it in such a way that it would contain authentic Nazi dogma, and also to do what was necessary to correct errors and delete exaggerations that might impair its effectiveness.
1. Germany will win the war.
2. Germany has the best armaments, the best soldiers, and the best leadership.
     
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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