WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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Serge reminded me that the earliest newspaper reports about Kiesinger would surely be in the Potsdam archives in East Germany. He had already got the basic data from the Library of Contemporary Jewish Documents (CDJC) in Paris. Then he remembered one of the lecturers he had had at the Sorbonne, Professor George Castellan, a historian of the German army. Serge telephoned him and told him he wanted to do research in the Potsdam archives. Castellan gave him the name of a Herr Heyne, the director of Franco-German Cultural Relations in East Berlin.

In 1967, East Berlin was one of the most mysterious of European cities, and to go there with such a purpose as ours could be compromising. Serge had worked for Martial de la Fournière, a technical adviser to Secretary of the Army Pierre Messmer, and so he wrote him as follows:

"My wife, a French citizen, has been dismissed from her job here in France for publishing an article exposing a German as a former Nazi. France has done nothing to help her, but I myself feel obliged to assist her. We need to collect data on Kiesinger. The papers we need are in East Berlin. I want to make all this clear so that I will not be accused of foolhardiness, espionage, interference with diplomatic relations, etc."

Serge's forthrightness must have had some effect, for we had no trouble whatever.

Serge took several days' leave, and went to East Berlin. He located Heyne in the Volkskammer and explained what he wanted. He was directed to the Ministry of the Interior, where on the following day he explained his intention of collecting data on Kiesinger's past to a committee of seven or eight persons. The committee's response was favorable, and for the next three days Serge took copious notes on the thick files he was given. He returned from East Berlin with a huge folder of photocopies. He had also discovered a book by Raimund Schnabel on radio propaganda under Hitler.

To the papers from East Berlin we added items we had unearthed at the Wiener Library in London, as well as thousands of microfilms we ordered – to the tune of $400 – from the United States State Department catalog. A quick survey of these papers enabled me to write and have printed at our expense a pamphlet entitled "The Truth about Kurt-Georg Kiesinger," which appeared before Christmas 1967.

We began to experience the day-to-day hardships produced by
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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