WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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political life on a new course because they really want to do so and because they have shown proof of their political maturity. Attaining the Foreign Ministry of the Federal Republic is the first step in their achievement of power. It is in the interest of countries that fear Germany's ambitions to help Brandt become Chancellor. The countries of the East in particular should welcome him with all the consideration and admiration due a man who was and still is their ally in the war against Nazism. They should also regard him as the only true spokesman for Germany, and should refuse to deal with Kiesinger. Finally, they should do their utmost to help Brandt in his efforts to solve the German problem by bringing the two Germanys together in a socialist framework. Thus the German people will, doubtless with satisfaction, grow accustomed to the prospect of having as their Chancellor not some former minor official in the Nazi regime, but a foreign minister who is the pride of his country. In that respect the interests of France, and of all Europe from the Atlantic to the Urals and beyond, are the same.

At that time Brandt was almost unknown in France, and no one, not even in Germany, dared gamble on his political future.

All of my political stands increased the hostility of my superiors and colleagues at the OFA. No one ever mentioned my articles in my presence, but there was a noticeable effort to make my working conditions more and more unbearable. A confrontation was at hand.

Though I felt the storm gathering at work, the joys of my home life absorbed me completely. Our private life was more easygoing and gay than if each element of our commune had lived apart. Arno was growing up and he delighted me. Serge had resigned from ORTF and joined Continental Grains, the leading multi-national cereal firm. He was being trained as a specialist in complicated brokerage matters, and so he traveled frequently, especially in Eastern Europe, where his knowledge of Russian was of great help to him.

We were so well organized that I could go traveling alone, as Serge had done ten years earlier. In May I went to the United States and to Guatemala, where Serge had relatives.

When I returned to Paris, I spent a day with Serge discussing events in the Middle East. The next day – June 6, l967 – war broke out. Serge and his constant companion Josy, who also worked for Continental Grains, enlisted as volunteers at the Israeli Embassy. They took a leave of absence, bought plane tickets for Tel Aviv,
     
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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