WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
Previous Page Back  Contents  Contents Page 15 Home Page Home Page  Forward Next Page 
     
my Wandering Jew, had not been to. He had just come out on top in the competitive examination for assistant director of the French National Radio and Television System (ORTF). In July 1964, be was promoted to work with the deputy director of radio broadcasting. And I had left my job with a firm of Lyon silk manufacturers and taken another as a bilingual secretary with the Franco-German Alliance for Youth (OFA), which de Gaulle and Adenauer had just established.

We had set the scene to live a stable, orderly life like that of thousands of other young couples.


I was very enthusiastic about the OFA. I even offered to write a handbook for young German girls working au pair in Paris. The book made a big splash in Germany, for it came out just at the right time: a German au pair girl had recently been murdered in Neuilly, and the German papers were full of the details.

My handbook was also the beginning of a great deal of friction between me and the OFA, its secretary general, François Altmayer, who was then in the Bonn office, and the director of the French wing, Robert Clément.

Although the OFA had approved of my writing the handbook, and although in the final analysis it subscribed to the line I took in it, it did not like to admit that the ideas of a young stenographer could be important. When I was invited to speak at conferences on Franco-German exchanges as a kind of expert, the OFA directors were quite cool to me, and they would always be careful to make it clear that "Mme. Klarsfeld is expressing only her own opinions. . ."

An incident with Voggenreiter, the publisher of the German edition of my handbook, further chilled my relations with the OFA by revealing how dependent the German branch was on the Bonn government, even though it was theoretically part of an independent bi-national agency.

I had listed among the cultural associations the Franco-German Exchange, which sponsored seminars in German history at the Sorbonne. Now, this was a French friendship association with the German Democratic Republic [East Germany]. My German publisher, who was hoping to sell a good number of my handbooks to the various state education ministries, had to withdraw all copies to revise the page with the address of the Franco-German Ex- […change]
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
Previous Page  Back Page 15 Forward  Next Page