FRENCH CHILDREN OF THE HOLOCAUST

A memorial
Serge Klarsfeld  

 
Previous Page Back  Contents  Contents Page 1697 Home Page Home Page  Forward Next Page 
     
 



In a boarding school called Sainte-Thérèse de l'Enfant Jesus in Avon, three Jewish children were hidden. They became the tragic heroes of Louis Malle's film Au revoir, les enfants: Jacques HALPERN (Jacques Dupré), Hans-Helmut MICHEL (Jean Bonnet), and Maurice SCHLOSSER (Maurice Sabatier). All three were deported on convoy 67 of February 3, 1944. Maryvonne Braunschveig published the result of her remarkable investigation, through which we have pictures of these children and the memories of some of their classmates.
Jacques HALPERN was born on July 14, 1926, in Paris. In 1943, I was in 10th grade with Jacques Dupré. He was a good student, especially in mathematics and science, but he was rather reserved. What distinguished him from the others was his maturity. Of middle height, olive-skinned, he seemed a bit older than us. He joined in enthusiastically in play during recess; I don't remember if he was especially close to any one of us. – François de Sieyès
I knew Dupré very well. He stayed in school on Saturdays and Sundays and helped me with little jobs around the school. He was very joyful. He sang musical comedy songs. He taught me [the song] 'Madame Arthur was talked about for a long time? – Jacques Mathieu, former bursar of the school
Hans-Helmut MICHEL was born on November 6, 1930, in Frankfurt. Jean Bonnet was an admirable boy of subtle intelligence, tall, thin, brown hair, piercing eyes. Of a retiring nature, but an excellent schoolmate. Not very athletic. – Charles-Louis La Caze
I remember him as being dark, curly-haired, kind of a child Kafka, I suppose. – Louis Malle
Maurice SCHLOSSER was born on December 15, 1928, in Paris. Sabatier was in my class. I know that for a while we were next to each other in the dormitory. We were always together. He was a bit isolated from the others (because of the circumstances) and so was I, but because of my temperament. I remember him very well: curly hair; nearly blond, a very pale skin. He blushed all the time. I even remember his voice very well. He spoke of his parents but quickly changed the subject. Once or twice he had a visitor. I can see him standing in a corridor speaking to a man in a beret. He told me afterwards that it was a member of his family. – Henri de Vogüé

(Page 84 shows their names entered on the Drancy register for January 18, 1944.)
   
   

FRENCH CHILDREN OF THE HOLOCAUST

A memorial
Serge Klarsfeld

 
Previous Page  Back Page 1697 Forward  Next Page