FRENCH CHILDREN OF THE HOLOCAUST

A memorial
Serge Klarsfeld  

 
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escape the roundup, we last heard from him a year ago, from the Saint-Louis Hospital in Perpignan. Nina stayed with us some eight months after the German invasion of the Free Zone, but then we had to give her to Madame Zlatyn, a social worker in Montpellier. This was in the spring of 1943, and we last heard from her ten months ago, from the children's home in Izieu. The Aronowicz family was supposed to emigrate to the United States; at the end of 1941, Nina had written to her aunt and uncle, who had managed to cross the Atlantic: We are very happy that you are already in America. We wish we were already there. Do you like America? After leaving the Regnats, Nina lived for a short time in the Jewish children's home in Campestre, from where, along with other children, she was transferred to Izieu. On July 3, 1943, Nina wrote from Izieu to her Aunt Constance: I am very happy to be here. There are beautiful mountains and from the summit we can see the Rhone flowing past and it is very pretty. Yesterday we went swimming in the Rhone with Mademoiselle Marcelle (one of our teachers). On Sunday we made a little birthday party for Paulette and two other children and we put on some plays and it was very nice. On July 25th we're having another party in honor of the whole camp. Nina's mother was deported on September 11, 1942, on convoy 31. Nina's father met the same fate on December 7, 1943, on convoy 64. Nina was deported on convoy 71 of April 13, 1944. The ID card shown here is Nina's registration card at Drancy. The number on the upper left (19224) is the Drancy registration number, and the stamped date (13 Avr 1944) is the date of deportation from Drancy.    
   

FRENCH CHILDREN OF THE HOLOCAUST

A memorial
Serge Klarsfeld

 
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