FRENCH CHILDREN OF THE HOLOCAUST

A memorial
Serge Klarsfeld  

 
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among the adults (630 women and 370 men) and those under 18 (61 girls and 19 boys). There were many parents with their young adult children, including 145 deportees between the ages of 16 and 22. Of the 80 who were under 18, all but 2 were born between 1924 and 1926; 1 was born in 1927 and 1 in1928. Like those taken in convoy 9, these adolescents who lived in or near Paris were taken because, for the most part, they were foreign born. Five were actually born in Paris, but 28 were born in Poland (20 in Warsaw), and 14 in Germany (5 in Berlin).

Convoy 11, July 27, 1942 (Drancy) In this convoy of 742 women and 248 men, 41 of the deportees were under 18: 40 were born between 1924 and 1926, and 1 in 1927. Three quarters (33) were girls. Because Jews had just been transferred to Drancy from Nancy and from Châlons-sur-Marne, there was a higher proportion of young people in this convoy from outside Paris than in the earlier convoys. Twenty-nine were from in or around Paris, 10 from Lorraine, and 2 from Haute Marne. But the proportion that was foreign born stayed high. Only 4 were French born; 19 were from Poland and 13 from Germany.

Convoy 12, July 29, 1942 (Drancy) As with convoys 10 and 11, convoy 12 deported far more women (730) than men (270). Of the 25 Jews under 18, 21 were girls. The youngest, Berthe Bursztyn, age 12, was born Office in France. All the others were foreign born, including two from Palestine: Abira Klarfeld, born in Haifa; and Sarah Kwawnik, born in Tel Aviv. While in France, most of them lived in Paris or its suburbs.

Convoy 13, July 31, 1942 (Pithiviers) Convoy 13 was the first deportation transport to leave from one of the Loiret camps after the massive influx there of the Jews, both children and their parents, from the Vel d'Hiv roundup. The camp director chose who would fill the convoy, placing priority ranking (for deportation) on fathers, their wives, and their foreign-born adolescent children. There were 690 males and 359 females. A majority of men (392) were between ages 39 and 52, while about half of the women (147) were between 38 and 48. There were 150 young people under 18 with their parents on this convoy, 78 boys and 72 girls. Most had been living in Paris, but only four were French born (Paris). Many came from Poland – 35 were born in Warsaw alone. Two sisters, Rebecca and Vera Berman, came from Istanbul. Most were born between 1924 and 1928; the four youngest were born in 1929 and 1930.

Convoy 14, August 3, 1942 (Pithiviers) Of all the deportation convoys, convoy 14 had the fewest males – a total of 52, of whom a majority were young boys. The 982 females deported were mothers and their adolescent daughters. Mothers were forceably [sic] separated from their younger children, in scenes of depthless anguish. On July 30, in alerting Berlin and Auschwitz to the departure of the previous convoy, Heinrichson, deputy to Dannecker, chief of the Gestapo's Jewish in France, had informed Eichmann and Hoess that "the children will not be included in this convoy. They will be taken in due time, on a separate trip. Meanwhile, given the requirements of the transports, the necessary separa- […tions]
    
   

FRENCH CHILDREN OF THE HOLOCAUST

A memorial
Serge Klarsfeld

 
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